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[geek] debian-amd64 results

I've been upgrading hard drives. Well, from one point of view I've been downgrading hard drives: I have a bunch of 10K U160 SCSI drives that I've been replacing with 7K2 SATA drives. But this means that I can't hear a hard-drive rumble from the PC next door when trying to get to sleep, so it's for the best. In any event, the drives I had may have been fast, but were also a) old, b) small, and c) loud. For instance, the capacity in neither machine exceeded 200Gb... so getting 2 200Gb drives has made it all better without being too expensive.

In a hiatus while waiting for Dabs to take back a non-working drive (and I'm going to be somewhat wary of having to return stuff to Dabs again) I was running two of the old SCSI drives in a software raid-0 which was fun, though :)

I also fried my old Athlon (Duron? I lost track...) Fortunately, I found one shop on TCR that actually had Socket A Semprons in stock, so it's been replaced with one of those. Looks like I managed to damage the die anyway, even if I didn't actually fry it... but in any event, it's just junk now :|

Anyway, after sorting that out, I repaved Debian on the main machine, which was easy-- the new debian-installer seems a step up from the old dbootstrap (?). Then I decided that I might as well try installing the amd64 port instead of sticking with the i386 emulation, so I did that and that's what I'm using now. It still looks a bit wierd to see 64-bit addresses in ldd output :} Wrestled a bit to get the latest kernel and nvidia drivers installed, but all done now.

I'm also experimenting with using KDE as the desktop-- it's pretty slick. It always was quite nice, but I never got in the habit. Some of the chrome is very snappy-- e.g. the chequered fade-in tooltip for the K menu icon.

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( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
esran
Jan. 28th, 2006 11:23 am (UTC)
KDE is pretty much the way to go with Linux desktops these days. We use Qt at work and its a pretty good toolkit.

However, I have these memories of Linux desktops, both Gnome and KDE of being groovy things with icons and gadgets and stuff. And then all of a sudden they become Windows clones. Drab and boring. Or was that just Redhat? Is evolution still going? That was groovy, if a bit resource intensive.

Sigh, now I'm even thinking about firing up the ancient linux box under my desk. Actually it might have BSD on it.
araqnid
Jan. 28th, 2006 11:26 pm (UTC)
RedHat did it more than many by encouraging fvwm95 et al. I remember in the early days of Gnome managing to get xmms visualisations to get swallowed into the panel... one of the features that was dropped because the maintainers thought it was too complicated for the users to figure out...

I do actually use Gnome at work-- since I'm stick with a small slow hard drive I can't have both installed at once to try them :| I'm seriously considering putting bits together into a new PC and taking that to work to use, especially since I have hard drives coming out of my ears at the moment... and a spare motherboard because I found out today that the KT890 doesn't actually support an X2 very well :(
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

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Steve Haslam

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